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If you have any questions about EAS please email:

General questions: 

eas_program@lists.utah.edu

Foundations program: 

foundations_eas@lists.utah.edu

Why EAS?

English for Academic Success classes are smaller in class size and provide opportunities for students to practice their English skills in a non-threatening environment.  Students who participate are better prepared for classes in their major and are acculturated to universities in the US.  Courses are specifically designed with language learners in mind and can cater to their specific needs while giving students full credit toward their degree.  We also provide classes that community members (not seeking credit) can take to improve their English.

 Writing classes

 Skills classes

 General Education requirements

 Graduate Level Courses

 Intensives

 Classes for Community Members (not for college credit)

 One on One English

Summer 2016 EAS Courses


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Writing Classes

Writing classes are offered as a way for international students to fulfill their writing requirement and be prepared for academic writing for the rest of their undergraduate career.  All three of these class are offered all semesters (fall, spring, and summer).  We recommend taking the writing sequence early in your studies.

EAS 1040 Grammar and Editing for Non-native Speakers (no placement test needed)

 Learn important grammar rules in English (First half of the semester:  verb tenses, subject and verb agreement, articles, etc. Second half of the semester:  sentence types, sentence structures, etc.)

 Write grammatically correct and correctly punctuated compound and complex sentences.

 Be able to identify and correct common grammar problems.

EAS 1050 Composition for Non-native Speakers (placement test required) EAS 1050+EAS 1060 = WRTG 2010

 Write an essay with the following features: relevant topic, limiting thesis statement, well-developed paragraphs, and proper essay format.

 Use the following aspects of the writing process: multiple drafts, peer reviews, independent revision for organization, and editing for sentence-level grammar.

 Write the following essay types: example, compare/contrast, cause/effect and argument.

 Control the following elements: sentence structure (e.g. subject-verb agreement, article usage, etc.), sentence type (e.g. simple, compound, complex, etc.) and stylistic elements (e.g. word choice, word usage, etc.)

 EAS 1050+EAS 1060 = WRTG 2010

EAS 1060 Advanced Expository Writing (for EAS Speakers) 

Take only after EAS 1050.

This course is designed to help you develop some of the skills necessary to succeed with academic writing in the university environment. In this class you will:

 Develop skills of summarizing, analyzing, and synthesizing both academic and professional writing.

 Learn various rhetorical and research strategies, especially as they relate to the construction of extended formal arguments.

 Become familiar with the Marriott Library and learn how to gather information from a variety of sources, including books, journals, the Internet, and other reference material.

 Develop a greater awareness of your own attitudes and learn to think critically about the world that surrounds you.

 Learn to use proper citations (i.e., summarize or quote another author) and create bibliographies in the APA format.

 EAS 1050+EAS 1060 = WRTG 2010


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Skills Classes

These classes work on specific skills that are beneficial to undergraduate students and do earn credit toward graduation.  Each of these classes is offered on an ‘as needed basis’, but usually every semester.

EAS 1100 Integrating Language Skills in EAS 

Emphasis on improving language skills in four different areas: a) improving listening and note taking skills through listening to academic lectures and taking notes in class, b) developing effective strategies for improving reading skills, c) reviewing grammatical structures in English that often prove troublesome to second language learners, and d) improving oral skills by giving oral presentations in class, participating in role-plays, and exploring a variety of academic topics through text, audio and videotapes, and guest lectures.

 Note-taking skills

 Effective reading strategies

 Better knowledge of English grammatical structures

 Oral presentation skills

EAS 3060 Advanced ESL Communications Skills

An integrated-skills course designed to improve reading, writing, speaking, and listening through note-taking, writing and revision of expository papers, and making class presentations.

 Develop skills for making academic presentations.

 Improve listening skills

 Improve note-taking skills

 Polish oral communication skills in a university classroom (pronunciation and speaking skills)

 Improve academic reading skills

 Improve academic writing skills

 Contribute successfully to group work

EAS 4300 Advanced Pronunciation and oral skills for undergraduate students

Focus on the development and fluency of oral skills.  Intensive pronunciation practice and instruction for non-native English speakers.  Emphasis on the features of English pronunciation that have the greatest effect on intelligibility.


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 General Education Requirements

All of our classes count toward your hours for your degree, but these classes also fulfill general education requirements that all students at the university must take before graduation.  Offered every semester.

EAS 1050+EAS 1060 = WRTG 2010

Fulfills WR2 lower division writing requirement

EAS 1600 Teaching and Learning across Languages and Cultures

(fulfills DV and HF) the overall goal of this course is to develop an understanding of the process of communicating across cultural boundaries.  Since culture is both a producer and product of communication, the appreciation of communication processes is an essential factor in promoting positive intercultural relations.  Specifically we will aim to:

 Increase understanding of cultural issues that influence the effectiveness of communication

 Enhance appreciation of the diverse ways of communicating in different cultures

 Apply analytical skills in examining intercultural interaction

 Consider techniques for improving intercultural communication within various types of environments


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Graduate Level Classes

EAS 6060 Advanced ESL communications skills for graduatestudents 

An advanced integrated skills course designed to improve reading, writing, speaking and listening skills through note-taking, writing short essays, and giving oral lectures and presentations in class.  Assumptions and interactions practices of the American classroom are emphasized.

 Reading, writing, speaking, and listening

 Interaction with other graduate students

 Presentation skills in specific disciplines     

EAS 6300 Advanced Pronunciation and oral skills for graduate students

Focus on the development and fluency of oral skills.  Intensive pronunciation practice and instruction for non-native English speakers.  Emphasis on the features of English pronunciation that have the greatest effect on intelligibility.

EAS 6150 Intro to Grad Writing 1

 Focus on the development of the writing process for specific fields of study and research skills.  This course has a heavy emphasis on writing in U.S. Universities and the practices and assumptions made about research, citation, style and form.

 Write an essay with the following features: relevant topic, limiting thesis statement, well-developed paragraphs, and proper essay format.

 Use the following aspects of the writing process: multiple drafts, peer reviews, independent revision for organization, and editing for sentence-level grammar.

 Write the following essay types: example, compare/contrast, cause/effect and argument.

 Control the following elements: sentence structure (e.g. subject-verb agreement, article usage, etc.), sentence type (e.g. simple, compound, complex, etc.) and stylistic elements (e.g. word choice, word usage, etc.)

EAS 6160 Intro to Grad Writing 2

 Advanced course with focus on development of the writing process for specific fields of study and research skills.  This course has a heavy emphasis on writing in U.S. Universities and the practices and assumptions made about research, citation, style and form.

 Develop skills of summarizing, analyzing, and synthesizing both academic and professional writing.

 Learn various rhetorical and research strategies, especially as they relate to the construction of extended formal arguments.

 Become familiar with the Marriott Library and learn how to gather information from a variety of sources, including books, journals, the Internet, and other reference material.

 Develop a greater awareness of your own attitudes and learn to think critically about the world that surrounds you.

 Use proper citations


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Intensives

Intensive classes are designed to help students and community members at high proficiency levels, visiting scholars, and faculty who have a busy schedule, but still want to work on English skills.

EAS 14 Intensive pronunciation

Intensive pronunciation workshop and instruction for non-native English speakers focusing on oral and fluency skills. Emphasis on the features of English pronunciation that have the greatest effect on comprehensibility. This class features an initial recorded assessment and a post-workshop individual assessment. Additional practice material is provided for continued self-study.

EAS 20 Intensive presentation skills 

An intensive skills course with specific focus on oral and presentation skills.  Participants will participate in presentations and receive direct feedback on how to improve communication and intelligibility.

EAS 25 Intensive writing for academia

An intensive writing workshop series to help with concise language, strong argumentation, self-editing, and tools for voiding the 10 most common writing mistakes for international students.


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 Classes for Community Members (not for college credit)

Members of the community are welcome to sign up for the following courses.  These do not count for college credit.  They are designed at a college level.

EAS 104 Grammar and Editing for Non-native Speakers

 Learn important grammar rules in English. (First half of the semester:  verb tenses, subject and verb agreement, articles, etc. Second half of the semester:  sentence types, sentence structures, etc.)

 Write grammatically correct and correctly punctuated compound and complex sentences.

 Be able to identify and correct common grammar problems.

EAS 105 Composition for Non-native Speakers

Focus on the development of the writing process for specific fields of study and research skills.  This course has a heavy emphasis on writing in U.S. Universities and the practices and assumptions made about research, citation, style and form.

EAS 110  Integrating Language Skills in ESL 

Emphasis on improving language skills in four different areas: a) improving listening and note taking skills through listening to academic lectures and taking notes in class, b) developing effective strategies for improving reading skills, c) reviewing grammatical structures in English that often prove troublesome to second language learners, and d) improving oral skills by giving oral presentations in class, participating in role-plays, and exploring a variety of academic topics through text, audio and videotapes, and guest lectures.

EAS 160 Teaching and Learning across Languages and Cultures

The overall goal of this course is to develop an understanding of the process of communicating across cultural boundaries.  Since culture is both a producer and product of communication, the appreciation of communication processes is an essential factor in promoting positive intercultural relations.

EAS 306 Advanced ESL Communications Skills

An integrated-skills course designed to improve reading, writing, speaking, and listening through note-taking, writing and revision of expository papers, and making class presentations.

EAS 430 Advanced Pronunciation and oral skills

Focus on the development and fluency of oral skills.  Intensive pronunciation practice and instruction for non-native English speakers.  Emphasis on the features of English pronunciation that have the greatest effect on intelligibility.


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One on One English

The EAS program is offering private EAS/ESL classes that are personalized to the student’s schedule and specific language needs.

 Pronunciation, writing, grammar, test prep, interview or presentation skills

 One- hour, one-on-one sessions

 Classes taught by University of Utah instructors

 Tuition $50-60/hr, depending on number of sessions desired

Contact Karen Marsh Schaeffer at karen.marsh@utah.edu

Last Updated: 2/15/17